Voorhees Biology students present scientific research

A A

Voorhees Biology students present scientific research

November 21, 2016

Three Voorhees College junior biology majors, Akeena Harper, Jennifer William, and Roseline Achiangia attended the 6th annual Southeastern Medical Scientist Symposium (SEMSS) at the University of Alabama to present their scientific abstract.
 
During the symposium, the students presented their abstract on reverse antibiotic-resistance in bacteria with Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and programmed bacteriophage. The audience was comprised of students in doctoral programs, medical students, and undergraduates from all over the Southeastern United States.
 
The research exhibits the uprising epidemic of resistance   to antibiotics and its effects on human health. In the study, the students used phages for delivering a programmable DNA nuclease, an adaptive microbial immune system named CRISPR, to reverse antibiotic resistance and eliminate the transfer of resistance between strains. 
 
"Many people believe that medicine solely comprises of doctors and they forget about the researchers behind the scenes. I am excited to present a collaborative and vital piece of research that will improve the nature of medicine. I would like to thank the SEMSS for creating a program that allows various subfields in medicine to come together as one,” said William.

Achiangia said that working in the lab has given her a new interest of conducting research. Through SEMSS, she has had opportunities to present her research to influential people andnetwork.
 
Harper who aspires to be a pediatrician, constantly seeks hands on experiences. "The more programs that I participate in, the further in my scientific journey I, go gaining more experience and knowledge. The SEMSS program gave me another perspective into the medical field that I will be able to apply later in my career,” said Harper.
 
The students are proud of the work they have produced. Dr. Zhabiz Golkar, department head for the Department of Health and Natural Sciences, was extremely excited about the opportunities that allow her student researchers to gain exposure and present their findings.
 
One of my goals is to enhance the impact of undergraduate research experiences on student intellectual growth, affective development, and interest in doing graduate work in the Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics field. Participating in such national symposiums gives our students the opportunity to build networking and improve their career choice from classrooms to professional world.”
 
For more information, contact Megan Freeman, director of communications, at 803-780-1191 or at mfreeman@voorhees.edu.